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How that Facebook Guy Will Change Our Industry…And More

How that Facebook Guy Will Change Our Industry…And More

Imagine driving up to a building, holding up your phone and being able to see the stacking plan, ownership information, asking rental rates and any other information typically available. The owner could even put a sign on the building with a tenant’s logo or name before a space tour.

Email - The Most Unreliable Form of Communication

Email - The Most Unreliable Form of Communication

As married as I have been to my email since my first AOL account in 1994, I am finally ready to throw in the towel. It dawned on me a few weeks ago, when my unread emails in my personal account exceeded 500, and was reinforced when I was on vacation last week. It never stops.

One More For the Extinct List: Cash

One More For the Extinct List: Cash

This week, our president-elect, Donald Trump, is meeting with the leaders of some of the biggest technology companies in the United States including Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google, Oracle, Cisco, IBM, and Intel. Rumor has it that Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk may even make an appearance.

Where's the off button?

Over the last month, I have paying attention to how connected we are - both as an industry and as a culture - to our phones.  They are great, aren't they?  I was in a session earlier this week at the CoreNet Summit on mobility and one group came up with forty things that our phones have replaced.  On the list were magazines, newspapers, CD's, and even friends. But it seems that we constantly have our heads buried in our phones and I'm just as guilty as the next person.  During another session, I looked around and at least half the room had their heads down and phones open.  This was a session and an event that I found very interesting and others had chosen to attend.  However, it's almost done by force of habit that as soon as we are bored for a second, we check our email, FacebookLinkedIn, etc.

Trust None Of What You Hear...

We live in a time of unprecedented access to information.  This isn't news.  The problem with so much information is that not all of it is good.  In an effort to get the information out quickly, people don't always take enough time to make sure that the information is factually correct.  Twitter's 140 character limit also forces people to be brief which may not allow them to get a full thought across accurately. In the last few weeks, I have been on the receiving end of so much bad information, some from the press and some business related, that it really made me take a step back.  For example, someone walked in to my office two weeks ago with a "comp" for a recent deal.  I already had the information, but his source, the landlord, told him that the rent was $2/sf higher than the actual deal terms.  In my view, the owner of the building was giving bad information to the market in an effort to increase the rents on future deals.